A Tailored Approach to Address Climate Change Impacts in Ethiopia and South Africa

MOTIVATION Global climate change impacts food and water security in significant ways, and developing countries will most likely bear the brunt of the adverse consequences. The lack of adaptive capacity and already high levels of poverty make these countries’ rural population and agriculture sector vulnerable. With support from the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and >> Read more

Innovation in Insurance: Managing the Risky Business of Weather

On March 29-30, 2017, the Chicago Council on Global Affairs will host the Global Food Security Symposium in Washington, D.C. IFPRI has been helping design and evaluate index insurance products to aid farmers in mitigating the impact and managing the risks associated with severe weather and crop loss.

Securing Cereal Availability in Ethiopia

IFPRI’s research in Ethiopia dispelled the commonly believed causes of cereal price hikes: cross-border trade, increased demand for consumption, diversification into high-value crops, and speculative hoarding. In 2006, Ethiopian cereal prices were rising sharply and threatened food security, especially for net cereal purchasers. To develop research-based evidence to inform policy responses to the price spikes, IFPRI conducted a set of studies that examined agricultural production, markets, and prices within the country.

Transformative Collaboration in Ethiopia

Ethiopia is one of the poorest, most populous, and largest countries in Africa. It has suffered challenging conditions over the past several decades such as the 1984 drought combined with civil war that resulted in a catastrophic famine,

Evaluation of Ethiopia Agricultural Growth Program

Upon request from the Ethiopian government and its development partners, ESSP is conducting an evaluation of the Agricultural Growth Program

Ethiopia Rural Household Survey

IFPRI has been associated with the collection and analysis of ERHS data since the survey’s first round in 1989, when data on consumption, assets, and income were critical to understanding the household-level response to food insecurity during civil conflict.