Germany (Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development)

Germany prioritizes rural development and food security in its international development agenda. For almost two decades, the support of German partners—including the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), several German universities such as the Center for Development Research (ZEF) at the University of Bonn, and the nongovernmental organization Welthungerhilfe—have been instrumental in IFPRI’s work in poverty alleviation, land degradation, climate change, improving health and nutrition, and developing and reporting on the Global Hunger Index. These partnerships continue to produce evidence-based research, driven by their aligned priorities to ensure sustainable food production and healthy food systems.

This brochure highlights some of the key research between IFPRI and Germany.

Pro-poor Growth and Investment in Lagging Rural Regions of Ghana and Viet Nam

The purpose of this line of research was to understand the role of agriculture in development, and how to achieve economic growth that benefits poor people in the most impoverished regions. To this end, and with support from BMZ and in partnership with the University of Hohenheim, IFPRI built regionalized economic models for Ghana and Viet Nam to evaluate the effectiveness of various development strategies. The work also involved training Ghanaian and Vietnamese collaborators on economy-wide modeling, and coordinating outreach and dissemination of results at the national and international levels.

Ensuring Yemen’s Food Security

In response to the 2007–2008 global food crisis, the Government of Yemen asked IFPRI to develop a National Food Security Strategy (NFSS). IFPRI, building on its previous work on food security in Yemen, provided technical support for the development of the strategy in close collaboration with the multi-ministerial Yemen Food Security Committee and with the support of GIZ, the European Union, and the World Bank. In addition, with support from GIZ’s "One World, No Hunger" Initiative, IFPRI continues to provide evidence-based solutions for tackling hunger in times of war through technical assistance, research and analysis, capacity building, and helping coordinate high-level policy workshops.

Strategic Investment Planning to Improve Growth and Reduce Poverty in Africa

In 2004, BMZ was one of the first organizations to partner with IFPRI in supporting the NEPAD Secretariat and the implementation of CAADP. BMZ’s partnership allowed IFPRI, between 2004 and 2007, to prepare a roadmap to guide the CAADP implementation process, establish the program’s credibility among development partners, and facilitate the adoption of the CAADP agenda by more than 20 African countries and by regional economic communities. From 2008 to 2011, IFPRI assisted the NEPAD Secretariat and regional economic communities in implementing and advocating for the CAADP agenda at the regional, sub-regional, and national levels. IFPRI also helped build the capacity of national teams and experts to lead the analytical work.

Information Services and Analyses on Food and Nutrition Security

The food price crisis of 2007–2008 threatened global food security. The access of households to quality and nutritious food was especially at risk due to their diminished purchasing power. In an effort to assist the United Nations (UN) Secretary-General and the UN High-Level Task Force (HLTF) on the Global Food Security Crisis, GIZ supported IFPRI in delivering relevant information and cutting-edge analyses on food and nutrition policy actions.

The Global Hunger Index

To rank countries and illustrate trends in hunger worldwide, IFPRI, Concern Worldwide, and Welthungerhilfe developed the Global Hunger Index (GHI), which captures four indicators of hunger: undernourishment, child wasting, child stunting, and child mortality. Using data from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the World Health Organization (WHO), and UNICEF, the index ranks countries on a 100-point scale, with 0 being the best score (no hunger) and 100 being the worst. The GHI is updated annually to track progress. By highlighting this information, the index serves as a tool for mobilizing political will and promoting effective policies to combat hunger. For more than a decade, the GHI has helped to increase country accountability in order to reduce hunger and undernutrition.

Tracking Hunger and Strengthening Resilience: An IFPRI-Germany Partnership towards Sustainable Development

IFPRI has been partnering with German development agencies, universities, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) for more than three decades to build the evidence base needed to effectively tackle pressing development issues.