Highlights of Recent IFPRI Research and Partnerships with Germany

This brochure highlights key research collaborations between IFPRI and German institutions in recent years. For more than three decades, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) has engaged in strong partnerships with German development agencies, universities, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to build the evidence base needed to effectively tackle pressing development issues. Initially, IFPRI and >> Read more

IFPRI and IFAD Guiding Investments and Policy Making

Reliable, timely data are crucial to making strategic investments and designing cutting-edge policies in food and nutrition security, yet such data are often lacking in developing countries. To fill this gap, the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) teamed up with other partners to build real-time tools >> Read more

Improving Smallholder Farmers’ Market Access and Resilience

Smallholder farmers has a central part in addressing poverty, hunger and undernutrition. For this reason, the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) has focused its work on smallholder farmers and poor rural people. The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) has contributed to IFAD’s work in establishing improved market access and resilience for smallholder farmers.

ReSAKSS: 10 Years of Promoting Evidence-Based Policy Planning and Implementation under CAADP

Ten years after its establishment, the IFPRI-facilitated ReSAKSS in Africa serves as a vital support to the implementation of CAADP. On October 18-20, 2016, the 2016 ReSAKSS Annual Conference will be held in Accra, Ghana to review and discuss the CAADP implementation.

IFPRI and WFP: Rethinking Food Aid to Reach the Poor

In the mid-2000s, as the World Food Programme (WFP) partnered with IFPRI to evaluate which type of transfer—cash, food, or a combination—is most effective in putting food on the table for the poor in Bangladesh, Ecuador, Niger, Uganda, and Yemen.

Securing Cereal Availability in Ethiopia

IFPRI’s research in Ethiopia dispelled the commonly believed causes of cereal price hikes: cross-border trade, increased demand for consumption, diversification into high-value crops, and speculative hoarding. In 2006, Ethiopian cereal prices were rising sharply and threatened food security, especially for net cereal purchasers. To develop research-based evidence to inform policy responses to the price spikes, IFPRI conducted a set of studies that examined agricultural production, markets, and prices within the country.