Ethiopian Strategy Support Program: Country-led, country-driven development

The overall goal of IFPRI’s Country Strategy Support Program (CSSP) is to promote greater progress toward sustainable and pro-poor growth in developing countries by improving the design and implementation of development strategies. One of these successful efforts is the Ethiopia Strategy Support Program (ESSP), launched in 2004 with support from DFID and other donors. ESSP >> Read more

Increasing Strategic Agricultural Public Spending in Nigeria: Transforming the sector

With the support of DFID, IFPRI has for many years been at the forefront of measuring how public expenditures affect agricultural productivity and rural poverty. The strategic allocation of public expenditures in agriculture is crucial to ensuring food and nutrition security, and poverty reduction. In Nigeria, increasing agricultural productivity promises positive impacts on the poor, >> Read more

Preschool Nutrition in Guatemala and Zimbabwe: Lifelong benefits

DFID’s support of IFPRI has enabled researchers to produce landmark work confirming that early nutrition matters for development later in life. Specifically, IFPRI’s research has shown that investing in preschool nutrition has long-term positive health and economic impacts—and that failing to invest can wreak long-term damage. In 2006, IFPRI determined that undernourished preschoolers in Zimbabwe >> Read more

Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Programme: Enhancing people’s resilience

Ethiopia is one of the poorest, most populous, and largest countries in Africa. It has suffered challenging conditions over the past several decades—such as the 1984 drought combined with civil war that resulted in a catastrophic famine. Over the years, Ethiopia has received a large share of Africa’s emergency food aid. In 2005, the Government >> Read more

HarvestPlus: Reducing micronutrient malnutrition

Since 2004, alongside 70 partner organizations in more than 40 countries, HarvestPlus, which is supported by several transformational donors including the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), has sought to reduce micronutrient malnutrition through biofortification. This means conventionally breeding staple food crops with higher levels of key micronutrients—namely, iron, vitamin A, and zinc—identified by >> Read more

IFPRI & DFID: 30 years of Making a Difference

IFPRI’s work in providing cutting-edge research on food and nutrition security has long depended on strategic partnerships with donors, universities, research organizations, and others around the world. One of the Institute’s key collaborators is the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), which has served as a strategic and collaborative donor and partner to IFPRI for more than 30 years.