Enhancing South-South Learning: From Brazil to Africa

Photo Credit: Swathi Sridharan/2010

Photo Credit: Swathi Sridharan/2010

Brazil has made impressive progress in reducing poverty. Rural poverty has been cut almost in half, from 51 percent in 2002 to 29 percent in 2011, and family farmers’ incomes grew by 50 percent. These results were achieved partially through Fomento, a set of government-run social programs targeting smallholder farmers. When a program shows such promising outcomes, it raises the question: Can this program be replicated in other countries?

In 2013, based on the experience of Fomento, IFPRI designed and implemented similar but tailored programs in Malawi and Senegal in partnership with DFID, the National Smallholder Farmers Association of Malawi (NASFAM) and Innovations for Poverty Action in Malawi, and Fédération des Organisations Non-Gouvernementales du Sénégal (FONGS) in Senegal. After one year of implementation in Senegal, those who received cash transfers produced agricultural outputs worth 100 percent more than the cash transfer; further, they invested in additional livestock for the next rainy season. In Malawi, there were also large returns to the cash and input transfers after one year of implementation. The project and its intermediate results have been discussed with government officials from Brazil, Malawi, and Senegal. Brazil hopes to learn from this collaboration to improve its strategic planning for aid and development in Africa.

For more information on IFPRI's research and partnerships in Latin America and the Caribbean, please go to this brochure.